Bridge Philanthropic Consulting (BPC) Expands its Vision with a New Social Justice Practice ​

Dwayne Ashley, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Bridge Philanthropic Consulting (BPC) as a leader in social justice work, announces that it will expands its platform in Social Justice Practice, entitled Circa64. Whether it is fighting new wrongs or bringing new approaches to longstanding issues in the non-profit, fundraising, and philanthropic sectors, BPC plans to use its platform to drive change in the sector.

Like generations that remembered exactly where they were when they learned about the deaths of Emmitt Till, Martin Luther King, and Malcolm X, this generation recalls the same when they heard George Floyd’s cry to breathe and his call for his mother, as he was murdered. Months earlier Ahmaud Arbery was gunned down while jogging through a neighborhood. Breonna Taylor was killed by police performing a no-knock warrant and stories of more people are coming to light – the memory of those killed years ago being renamed and remembered, there is now more than ever a glaring need for corporate social justice and legacy strategy.

The legacy strategy is the setting up and shaping of the deceased foundation. The foundation honors their legacies and that will support their families/children.

Chart from Mapping Police Violence
999
people were shot and killed by police in 2019

Bridge Philanthropic Consulting (BPC), the largest African American owned fundraising firm, Circa64 will help swiftly set up the organization, small business, or foundation to the social entrepreneur, capitalists, and or family, long and short term. This includes walking alongside them to create a philanthropic strategy that includes product development and programming which can help fund the foundation. Our team helps them set up their licensing strategy so that they can use funds raised by their family member’s likeness to further capitalize the foundation. How this happens is through a legal process of protecting/trademarking the name and once you own the name and likeness of their family member outright, organizations would have to come to them and then pay the foundation a licensing fee if they want to use the name and likeness.

As Harvard Business Review declared, we are entering the Age of Corporate Social Justice. The standard Corporate Social Responsibility playbook of old best practices no longer works. It is time for a new playbook — a new framework and new partners with cultural competency to impact corporate institutions.